Are we REALLY all buying music from just TWO artists?

Drake and Ed Sheeran

What does YOUR Spotify playlist sound like? 

With the current state of the UK Top 40 pop chart of 'all things played on devices and radio stations in the country' you'd be forgiven for thinking we'd become a very one-track minded population, musically. Or perhaps it's closer to the truth to say a thirty-tracks-from-just-two-artists-minded population. 

Personally, the moment I realised that the flavour-of-the-moment ginger popster was dominating the purchasing choices of every commercial music fan in Great Britain, I called bullshit.

It's long been known that pretty much anyone with any brains or credibility in the music business doesn't really pay too much mind to that train-wreck of a weekly radio broadcast anymore. 

Ever since Neil Fox stopped hosting "The UK Top 40 - a countdown of the songs Britain is buying", we've pretty much sussed out that it was mostly manipulated by record companies, as a way to sell albums and tour dates. That said, as a jobbing DJ on both radio and on the decks, it's quite important to keep at least a watchful glance across the apparent trends.

You actually don't have to look much beyond the first ten songs in the list to spot a slightly suspicious pattern. 

Source: officialcharts.com

So, seeing that, we're supposed to believe that everybody wants to hear nothing but Drake and Ed Sheeran on repeat over and over and over and over again, maybe giving into the temptation of some naff entry-level EDM-by-numbers. Can that really be true?

Well, in short, no. 

Not at least according to actual credible music stats, from the less manipulable Shazam, a music tagging app. As in, something which people have actually input their music tastes on. Like, proper legit enquiries. Let's take a look at their top 10 shall we?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interesting, huh? Ed Sheeran barely makes the top half of that list, even with the most over-played song on his latest album. Drake is literally NOWHERE.

And being that the two are supposedly used by similar demographics....

Is it time that we started to laugh very loudly and sarcastically in the faces of anyone who tries to tell us the shape of the UK Top 40 pop chart? Or am I overthinking it?